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If you cannot attend our Annual Meeting next month, you can still vote in the co-op's trustee elections! There are three trustee candidates up for re-election this year. To... Continue Reading ›

A line of severe storms caused heavy damage to the Clay Electric service area on Tuesday, February 7. Some winds were estimated at over 70 mph. Numerous trees were pushed over or... Continue Reading ›

Co-op members gathered at three trustee district meetings in late January-early February to select candidates for the co-op’s board of trustees in Districts 2, 4 and 6.... Continue Reading ›

The Clay Electric Foundation board has approved seven organizations to be the first recipients of grant funding from the Operation Round Up program. Operation Round Up is a... Continue Reading ›

Clay Electric’s annual vehicle and equipment auction is going on now through Nov. 14. More than 50 vehicles, pieces of equipment and other items are up for auction. Photos and... Continue Reading ›

Consumers for Smart Solar—a diverse, bipartisan coalition of business, civic and faith leaders—today announced that the Florida Electric Cooperatives Association (FECA) has... Continue Reading ›

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What are the reasons for tree pruning and clearing?

The two most important reasons for tree pruning and keeping clear rights-of-way are member safety and service reliability. Trees must be pruned to prevent contact between power lines and tree limbs to reduce the constant threat of causing tree related power outages. “Climbable” trees near power lines are a safety hazard and must also be removed or pruned on a regular basis to prevent children from climbing the trees and coming in contact with the conductors. Limbs over hanging power lines must be pruned because of the threat of falling on the power lines during inclement weather and cause extensive outages and damage. Trees that grow too close to power lines can sway during inclement weather, such as thunder storms or high winds and touch the power lines. This gives electricity a path to the ground (which it is always seeking) causing a potentially serious fire and safety hazard along with power outages.