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It's easy to request electric services on ClayElectric.com! This video demonstrates how to submit a request for electric service to an existing location.

Clay Electric is focused on the health and well-being of our members, employees and the communities we serve. Our management team is working to address increasing concerns and... Continue Reading ›

Clay Electric Cooperative’s board of trustees has declared a $12 million Capital Credits refund for members who received service from 1990 through 2018. Capital Credits reflect... Continue Reading ›

With due regard to the safety and health of our members, Clay Electric Cooperative has made the difficult decision to cancel the gathering portion of its 82nd Annual Meeting. The... Continue Reading ›

Co-op members gathered at three trustee district meetings in late January 2020 to select candidates for the co-op’s board of trustees in Districts 2, 4 and 6. Incumbents Kelley... Continue Reading ›

As of 3 p.m. on Wednesday, September 4, the eye of Hurricane Dorian has nearly passed the state of Florida. The forecast calls for tropical storm force gusts and periods of heavy... Continue Reading ›

What are the reasons for tree pruning and clearing?

The two most important reasons for tree pruning and keeping clear rights-of-way are member safety and service reliability. Trees must be pruned to prevent contact between power lines and tree limbs to reduce the constant threat of causing tree related power outages. “Climbable” trees near power lines are a safety hazard and must also be removed or pruned on a regular basis to prevent children from climbing the trees and coming in contact with the conductors. Limbs over hanging power lines must be pruned because of the threat of falling on the power lines during inclement weather and cause extensive outages and damage. Trees that grow too close to power lines can sway during inclement weather, such as thunder storms or high winds and touch the power lines. This gives electricity a path to the ground (which it is always seeking) causing a potentially serious fire and safety hazard along with power outages.