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Clay Electric has recently seen a rise in reports of scam calls and misleading offers. The cooperative once again reminds its residential and commercial members that it does not... Continue Reading ›

On Apr. 9, 2018, Clay Electric honored the dedicated men who often work in challenging conditions to keep the lights on. The co-op proudly recognizes all electric linemen for... Continue Reading ›

A forecast team from Colorado State University has predicted a slightly above-average level of activity in the Atlantic basin this hurricane season. Phil Klotzbach and Michael... Continue Reading ›

Clay Electric Cooperative’s members re-elected three members to the board of trustees during the co-op’s 80th annual meeting on March 29, 2018 at the cooperative’s central office... Continue Reading ›

Clay Electric’s 80th Annual Meeting will be held on Thursday, Mar. 29, 2018 in Keystone Heights. Members will find it to be an activity-filled day. The morning’s musical... Continue Reading ›

Clay Electric Cooperative’s board of trustees declared a record $12 million Capital Credits refund for members who received service from 1988 through 2016. Capital Credits... Continue Reading ›

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What are the reasons for tree pruning and clearing?

The two most important reasons for tree pruning and keeping clear rights-of-way are member safety and service reliability. Trees must be pruned to prevent contact between power lines and tree limbs to reduce the constant threat of causing tree related power outages. “Climbable” trees near power lines are a safety hazard and must also be removed or pruned on a regular basis to prevent children from climbing the trees and coming in contact with the conductors. Limbs over hanging power lines must be pruned because of the threat of falling on the power lines during inclement weather and cause extensive outages and damage. Trees that grow too close to power lines can sway during inclement weather, such as thunder storms or high winds and touch the power lines. This gives electricity a path to the ground (which it is always seeking) causing a potentially serious fire and safety hazard along with power outages.